Solar power is a growing American success story

Hundreds of thousands of Americans have gone solar and millions more are ready to join their ranks so all of us can power our lives and our communities with clean, renewable, local energy. The barriers to solar are falling faster than ever, too, with more and more cities, states and companies adopting innovative pro-solar policies that have made solar cheaper and easier to install.

That’s why we have 10 times more solar power in the U.S. today than we did in 2010, enough to power more than 5 million homes, with another home going solar every two minutes, as of the end of 2015.

What are we up against? 

Yet just as solar is about to reach a tipping point, some utilities and other special interests want to throw new obstacles in the way. Our Solar for All campaign is working to knock those barriers out of the way so more Americans can go solar.

We’re working with our national network to urge mayors, governors and others to set ambitious solar goals and commitments, offer new solar incentives, and promote new community solar programs. And we’re mobilizing people to counter the utilities and other special interests who want to make solar more expensive and harder to install.

We’re fighting attacks

And we’re winning. In just the past year, we’ve turned back attacks on solar in Arizona, Colorado and New Mexico and won new commitments to solar in Austin and Houston, Athens and Atlanta, and New York State and California, among other places. Over the last 10 years, we’ve helped establish dozens of pro-solar programs, including the biggest: California’s Million Solar Roofs Initiative.

What can you do? 

We want you to join us by showing your support for solar. You can send an email to your local officials, write a letter to your local newspaper, attend one of our solar forums, or join us at a news conference or other special event.

Whatever you can do, the time for action is now. Solar is at a tipping point. If we keep winning more pro-solar policies, we’ll see millions more Americans go solar in the next decade, putting us on a path to a 100% renewable future. If we let utilities and other special interests get in the way, that future will remain out of reach as solar sputters and stalls.

Together, we can achieve Solar for All

We can do this. Together, we can bring more solar power to our homes, our communities, our churches and schools, our workplaces and our lives—and leave a cleaner, healthier world for kids growing up today and future generations.

Solar For All Updates

Report | Environment Maryland Research and Policy Center

Too Little, But Not Too Late

Maryland took a bold step toward reducing our contribution to global warming and breaking our dependence on fossil fuels with the passage of the Greenhouse Gas Reduction Act (GGRA) in 2009. The law set an ambitious but achievable goal of reducing Maryland’s emissions of global warming pollution by 25 percent below the 2006 level by 2020.

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Report | Environment Maryland Research and Policy Center

A Program that Works: How the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative is Helping the Northeast Shift to Clean Energy and Reduce Pollution from Fossil Fuels

The Northeast faces two fundamental and intertwined challenges: fossil fuel dependence and pollution from fossil fuels. Our dependence on coal, oil, and gas imposes economic costs, pollutes our air and water, and harms public health.

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Report | Environment Maryland Research and Policy Center

Danger in the Air: Unhealthy Air Days in 2010 and 2011

All Americans should be able to breathe clean air. But pollution from power plants and vehicles puts the health of our nation’s children and families at risk. Ground-level ozone, the main component of smog, is one of the most harmful and one of the most pervasive air pollutants.

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News Release | Environment Maryland

General Assembly Drops the Ball on the Environment

When presented with opportunities to develop clean energy, reduce pollution into the Chesapeake Bay, and promote smart growth, the Maryland General Assembly largely failed to make progress this year.

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News Release | Environment Maryland

Environment Ekes Out Some Wins

Brad Heavner's, State Director of Environment Maryland, statement about the Maryland’s 2010 General Assembly session.

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