Report | Environment Maryland Research & Policy Center

Electric Buses: Clean Transportation for Healthier Neighborhoods and Cleaner Air

Buses play a key role in in our nation’s transportation system, carrying millions of children daily to and from school and moving millions of Americans each day around our cities. Buses reduce the number of individual cars on our roads, make our communities more livable and sustainable, and provide transportation options for people of all ages and abilities. Yet, the majority of America’s buses remain dirty – burning fossil fuels like diesel that put the health of our children and communities at risk and contribute to global warming.

Report | Environment Maryland

Shining Cities 2018: How Smart Local Policies Are Expanding Solar Power in America

Solar power is expanding rapidly. The United States now has over 53 gigawatts (GW) of solar photovoltaic (PV) capacity installed – enough to power 10.1 million homes and 26 times as much capacity as was installed at the end of 2010.[1] Hundreds of thousands of Americans have invested in solar energy and millions more are ready to join them.

Report | Environment Maryland Research & Policy Center

The Benefits of the Clean Car Standards

The clean car standards are national regulations and incentives for the auto industry designed to reduce pollution from the transportation sector. Since passed in 2012, the standards have saved consumers money, reduced pollution, and spurred innovation.

Report | Environment Maryland Research and Policy Center

Wind Power to Spare: The Enormous Energy Potential of Atlantic Offshore Wind

The Atlantic coast states are dependent on fossil fuels, which pollute our air, put our health at risk, and contribute to global warming. In response, states in the region are moving toward an energy system powered by clean, renewable sources: Atlantic states now generate enough wind and solar energy to power nearly 2 million homes, 19 times more than just a decade ago.

Report | Environment America Research & Policy Center

Troubled Waters

Over a 21-month period from January 2016 to September 2017, major industrial facilities released pollution that exceeded the levels allowed under their Clean Water Act permits more than 8,100 times. Often, these polluters faced no fines or penalties.

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