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You can’t make good beer with bad water | Russell Bassett

Americans care about clean water for a whole host of reasons – fishing and swimming, protecting wildlife, and safe drinking water. But as I was reminded last week by Jenn Vervier at New Belgium Brewing, clean water is also vital for excellent beer.  Understanding that great beer takes great water, many of America’s breweries have come out in support of the proposed clean water rule. Noticeably absent from the list of the rule’s supporters, however, is America’s biggest brewery: Anheuser-Busch. 

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Maryland is ahead of the curve on solar energy

As a lifelong Marylander, I'm proud of the progress that our state has made through successful, bi-partisan initiatives supporting renewable and efficient energy throughout the state. As such, I was concerned when I read a letter published in the Sun on Jan. 26 ("Maryland bucks the trend on solar energy"). The author, an environmental stakeholder, mentioned that she was embarrassed that Maryland hasn't taken enough steps to support solar energy. Unfortunately, she misses a significant portion of the statistical narrative.

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News Release | Environment Maryland Research & Policy Center

Report: Small or large, all fracking companies break rules

From Fortune 500 companies, to mom-and-pop operators, to firms like Chevron who tout their clean records, virtually all drilling and fracking companies are prone to infractions of environmental rules, a new report says. The analysis of Pennsylvania’s oil and gas industry over a four-year period found that fracking companies violate protections for air, water, and health more than once each day on average.

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Report | Environment Maryland Research & Policy Center

Fracking Failures

Fracking is dirty. From the very beginning of clearing a site for drilling, through extraction, transport and delivery of finished products, fracking poses significant risks to our air and water and to human health. People who live and work near fracking sites are at greater risk for respiratory and neurological diseases.

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News Release | Environment Maryland

New Report: wind energy needed to combat global warming

The carbon pollution from two entire coal plants could be eliminated in Maryland if wind power supplied 30 percent of the nation’s electricity needs, according to a new analysis by Environment Maryland. The analysis comes just as Congress considers whether to renew tax credits critical to wind development. 

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